Too Many Passwords to Remember! What to Do?

The password manager stores the passwords either in an encrypted database or calculated on demand. This is the most important aspect of this software as is here where the information is safely crypto-stored. This means that no one, without the master password would be able to see the content of the database. There is a saying in the hacker’s world, anything can be hacked with the necessary motivation and time. With a good master password, the effort any hacker would have to put to crack the database encryption and the time required, will not worth it. So unless you have the billion dollar password there and some evil hacker knows about it, you are pretty safe.

It is unbelievable and frankly overwhelming the amount of passwords we need to remember for all our online accounts in our lives. Banking, emails, the online stores we like, the food delivery stores, the Wi-Fi, the Apple ID, Microsoft accounts, Government, etc. The list is quite large and to be honest, even frightening.

Most of us have heard all kind of security concerns about having the passwords saved as text the computer, as it would be too easy for a hacker to steal them. Or even worst, using the same “date of birth” password for all our accounts. So what are the options then? How can we stay safe in the online world without having to develop some sort of magnificent and quite remarkable short-medium-long term memory?

The option is using a password manager. A password manager assists in generating, managing and retrieving complex passwords, normally allowing to unlock their access via one single master password. So we have now narrowed them down to one, not bad.

But, why is it safe?

The password manager stores the passwords either in an encrypted database or calculated on demand. This is the most important aspect of this software as is here where the information is safely crypto-stored. This means that no one, without the master password would be able to see the content of the database. There is a saying in the hacker’s world, anything can be hacked with the necessary motivation and time. With a good master password, the effort any hacker would have to put to crack the database encryption and the time required, will not worth it. So unless you have the billion dollar password there and some evil hacker knows about it, you are pretty safe.

Now the question is, which password manager should I use?

To answer that, we would need first to see what types are available and what our needs are.  The types of password managers include locally-installed software applications, online services that are accessed through website portals or in some cases web browser extensions, and locally-accessed hardware devices that serve as keys. Depending on this and its functionality, the encrypted database is either stored locally on the user’s device or stored remotely through an online file hosting service.

By experience, we would recommend using a combination of both, locally and online stored database. To achieve that, what we need to do is using a password manager with a locally stored database, so you are under complete control. But because of the nature and its critical importance, it should be stored “online” using one of the multiple online storage services that offer synchronization across devices. This way you have your own database but shared and accessible from all your devices.

Accordingly to a May 2017 PC Magazine article written by their technical editor Neil J. Rubenking, these are the first 5 of the top seven free password managers:

Top 5 Free Passwords Managers

  1. LastPass: The free LastPass 4.0 has a bold new online interface, and features such as emergency access and automated password updating put it ahead of many competing for-pay password managers. Visit their website here: https://www.lastpass.com/
  2. LogMeOnce Password Management Suite Premium: The free LogMeOnce Password Management Suite Premium outperforms most of its for-pay competitors, and its new password-free authentication option means you don’t even have to remember a master password. Only LastPass rivals this excellent free password manager. Here is the link to the official website: https://www.logmeonce.com/
  3. Enpass Password Manager: Enpass Password Manager 5 is a big improvement over the edition we tested previously, but it still won’t challenge the best free password managers. Note, too, that you must pay if you want to use it on mobile devices. Here is the official website link: https://www.enpass.io
  4. KeePass 2.34: KeePass is the most configurable password manager around, but many of the convenient features we’ve come to expect are available only through third-party plug-ins. It is known that this password manager is not that user friendly as the others, but because of it is open source and multi-platform, it is for us one of the most secure and flexible of them all. It could easily be the best option for tech savvies. Here is download link: http://keepass.info/download.html. There are two options, Classic and Professional editions. This is a link to see the differences between both versions: http://keepass.info/compare.html.
  5. Symantec Norton Identity Safe: Symantec Norton Identity Safe has the basics covered. It’s free and does everything a password manager should do. However, some competitors offer much more flexibility and power for the same price. Here is official website link: https://identitysafe.norton.com/.

Hope we have been of any use and do not forget to book a tech online with us any time you are in need of a professional and friendly computer technician. We can also help with your smart TV, mobile phone or tablet.